Peak Hour for Cruise Ships on Sydney Harbour

Queen Victoria Leaving Sydney Harbour

Queen Victoria Leaving Sydney Harbour 5pm

Sydney, Friday

This evening we watched Cunard’s Queen Victoria make its way up Sydney Harbour and out to sea.

A short while later, the P&O Arcadia entered the Harbour on its maiden voyage.  We heard on the news that some people paid £25,000 to travel from the UK.  This is quite a bit more than was paid by the ‘Ten Pound Poms’ who migrated to Australia between 1945 and 1972,  including those who travelled on the first Arcadia.

Of course, the £25,000 fare includes a jacuzzi and butler.  Clive and his family came to Australia from England as Ten Pound Poms in 1962, on the final voyage of the P&O Strathnaver.  Clive says there was one little swimming pool but definitely no butlers.

The Queen Victoria is a 90,000 tonne ship, the Arcadia 84,000 tonnes.  The Strathnaver was a mere 22,000 tonnes.

Queen Victoria, Strathnaver, Arcadia

Queen Victoria, Strathnaver, Arcadia

Super February:  28 Cruise Ships in 28 Days

This is a record month, and year, for cruise ships in Sydney.  Last month I posted a photo of a Royal Caribbean ship at the Overseas Passenger Terminal at Circular Quay.

We also heard today that a third cruise ship is currently berthed at Darling Harbour.  Today’s ships accounted for six thousand passengers visiting Sydney on the same day.  The number is projected to rise to forty thousand by the end of the month.

Then, according to the Sydney Morning Herald, there will be four ships in Sydney on Sunday, March 1, three of which can’t fit under the Harbour Bridge.  Two of those will have to be moored in the Harbour and passengers ferried to shore.

It’s enough to make you wonder, ‘what recession?’

Arcadia Entering Sydney Harbour

The Arcadia Entering Sydney Harbour 6pm

Sydney Ports Ship Schedule
Related post:  Biggest Day for Cruise Ships on Sydney Harbour

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7 Responses

  1. Yes it would certainly get you thinking wouldn’t it!!! I don’t have 25,000 pounds and if I did, it would be used for my house..I wonder if these people are from America or somewhere and just sailed from the UK. Where do these people get all their money from,..? And six thousand visitors in one day, as well as everyone there..it must be heaving..not sure how big Sydney is though!

    I think my Uncle and his family went over as 10 pound poms…I am not sure but think they went to New Zealand first, then back to the UK, and then to Australia. My dad passed away in 1967, oh how I wish my mum had followed her brother…but no she didn’t want to leave her mum here on her own..

  2. Well the recession is hitting in Vancouver. We are booked on a cruise with RC May 30 to Alaska. This will be the last year that that particular ship will be cruising to Alaska from Vancouver – maybe its being redeployed to Australia ..hmmmm. I will check to see if you see the Serenade of the Seas in 2010.

  3. I’ve done a couple of cruises in my day. My husband now isn’t interested in trying one. You can go a little crazy when at sea for a while but when the ship pulls into a port it’s lots of fun.

  4. Goodness! That is one BIG boat! Wow!

    I have never been around the ocean. Well, I have been on the beach in Florida and Ocean City, Maryland and in Hawaii — but I have never seen an ocean liner. I am amazed at the size of those boats.

    Johanna, who lives in Vancouver, tells me they call the big freighters and ocean liners and ships just “boats”! Heh! I guess that works.

    The largest boat or ship I have ever seen is an iron ore ship on Lake Superior. I was stunned at the size and it appears that would be a small boat compared to the ones on your post!

    Take care!

  5. Anne, very cool your uncle was also a ten pound Pom! As for the visitors, Sydney is 4 million or more, so can absorb them … I’m sure the shops and restaurants at Circular Quay notice the influx.

    Joanne, thanks for visiting. A cruise to Alaska sounds fabulous – enjoy! Linda, I think I’m with your hubby although Alaska or the Norway fjords do appeal … Russell I too say ‘boat’, or used to – I also called yachts ‘sailboats’ but here that means really small ones so now I say ‘yachts’ and ‘ships’ 🙂

    Cheers all..

  6. Hi Carol,

    When I was growing up I always thought it was exciting to drive along the Hudson River in New York City and see the big ships that were in: the Queen Mary or the Queen Elizabeth or the United States or one of the French line ships.

    The year after I was in 3rd or 4th grade my grandmother embarked on an 8-week tour of Europe. She went over on the Queen Mary and came back on the Queen Elizabeth. I remember taking her to the ship in New York and going aboard to see her state room. She was traveling in second class I remember, and I thought her room seemed snug, but cute. I believe it took about 4-5 days across the Atlantic because, of course, the Cunard liner was not trying for a speed record.

    So many World War II veterans have memories of traveling across the Atlantic on the passenger liners that were converted to troop carriers. There is even a crazy I Love Lucy in which Lucy, Ricky, Fred, and Ethel went to Europe. Naturally Lucy managed to miss the boat, and had to be delivered to the deck via helicopter as the boat was sailing out of New York harbor. Of course as the use and popularity of jet aircraft increased, the word “cruise” had to be added to ship as people no longer boarded ships for transportation but for vacations.

    When I was studying American Literature and reading Edith Wharton, I remember noting that she had crossed the Atlantic some incredible number of times like 75 as she had homes in both Massachusetts and Paris. She was great friends with Henry James, another veteran “pond hopper.” It always seemed to me, however, that James had difficulty deciding whether he wanted to be American or British: Wharton was always an American who loved Paris.

  7. Eleanor, thanks for adding to our knowledge re adding ‘cruise’ to ‘ships’ 🙂

    The new Queen Mary just came into Sydney today.

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